The “ bohemian hippie-chic girl” is taking over and you can expect to see her appearance more frequently this summer.

With a predominantly female following, my limited knowledge of this subculture has come from the rise in masses of girls, in the 18 – 25 year age group, on instagram  promoting themselves as gypsy/bohemian/hippie chic girls. If only they could pick just one name.

It is hard to decipher whether this style is actually a subculture or more of a current trend within young females. Because this look never dates and has appeared numerous times throughout history. This subculture has sourced much of its inspiration from the late 1960’s hippie movement. But the modern bohemian hippy girl stands for entirely different things; they are more interested in fashion and anything that will look good in a photo whilst using social media to promote their casual relaxed lifestyle.

Instagram hippie gypsies

Instagram hippie gypsies

It is first important to understand where this new breed of bohemian hippie chic drastically differs from the original hippie movement. The original hippie subculture of the 1960’s was a political movement. Using clothing, among other things, to rebel against everything mainstream and show their affiliation to ideals that were then seen as radical. Through dress and a shared love of art, fashion and history these like-minded individuals formed what is now one of the most unforgettable subcultures of our history.

1960s

1960s

The current modern bohemian hippie is more focused on the aesthetics of the original hippie movement with no political affiliations. The current trend can be seen as a more decadent renewal of the bold patterns, excessive jewellery and styles worn by the original hippies. Their appearance is a carefully planned work of art combining outfits and accessories to attain the perfect “bohemian hippie chic” look.

Instagram Hippie 2014

Instagram Hippie 2014

“Essentially, the look is slightly non-conformist, and centred on whisking together luxurious fabrics and crafts with a pinch of orientalism, bohemian and the zest of being young and free” (Tudor 2015)

People who identify with this subculture fall under a whole series of names and all it takes to seek them out is an Instagram or Google search of any of these tags; gypsy, hippie, earth child, free spirit, bohemian, earth goddess. The interesting thing is that a significant amount of the clothing worn by people identifying with this subculture actually comes from expensive designer stores. There are stores that now specifically target their market at people who represent from this subculture. With one garment setting you back around 100-200 dollars. It actually costs a significant amount for these people to look so effortlessly put together and contradicts everything the original hippie movement stood for.

Expensive hippie fashion

Expensive hippie fashion

References:

Cantor, Bethany. 2015. ‘Fashion Trend Report: Hippie Chic’. Stylebistro. http://www.stylebistro.com/Fashion+Trend+Report/articles/tdkSsXQKswg/Fashion+Trend+Report+Hippie+Chic.

Halliwell, Ellie. 2015. ‘Byron Bay Outstripping Major Cities In Fashion’. Dailytelegraph.Com.Au. http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/entertainment/sydney-confidential/byron-bay-leads-cultural-rebirth-as-fashion-labels-like-gypsy-and-spell-collective-boom-in-surfside-hippie-culture/story-fni0cvc9-1227407387553.

Olivier, Lucy. 2015. ‘Haute Hippy’. Vogue UK. http://www.vogue.co.uk/fashion/trends/2015-spring-summer/hippy-fashion-spring-summer-2015-trend.

Tudor, Elisabeta. 2015. ‘Gypsy-Inspired Womenswear The Top Trend Of 2015 Resort Season’. South China Morning Post. http://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/fashion-watches/article/1677946/gypsy-inspired-womenswear-top-trend-2015-resort-season.

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