During the eighteenth and early nineteenth century came an evolution of manufactured fashion goods and the distribution of them among the masses via department stores. After 1850, glazed shop fronts were first introduced in Holland giving these stores the opportunity to expand their sales of these in demand fashionable goods. These stores devised a technique called the window display that allowed them showcase these nonessential items in a specific way to passers of the store. This technique of displays also replaced the common piling of stock common in markets and bazaars. (Berry 2015; Audas n.d.)

Over time the arrival of larger multistoried department stores allowed these stores to utilize a long plate of glass in order for the displays to be viewed with ease while passing by. The goods were eventually placed within a lifelike room setting with mannequins called “open displays” which relied on themes and narratives. “Open displays” were created to feature particular goods rather than exhibit the sheer quantity of goods within the store. (Audas n.d.)

Window displays represent a visual merchandiser’s tool in order to catch the eye of the customer and attract them into the store to produce sales. However today window displays are an important part to the promotional strategy of the store. It is not only used to draw customers into the store and stand out from their competitors, but is to communicate to the customers the brand image while also advertising the new trends of fashion. Brand image is developing a personality of a store for the target consumer to relate to and can enhance sales due to familiarity or emotions such as longing, desire or peer acceptance. (Opris 2013; Friedlander-Boss n.d.)

Luxury Fashion houses are known to create the most expensive window displays that in themselves create the most eye catching and show stopping designs. These luxury window displays are works of art. (Opris 2013)

Louis Vuitton is one of the brands that are well known for their creativity and association with other unique artists to create these memorable works especially window displays and instalments. A successful example of their window displays is their Spring/Summer 2011 accessories located in their Bond Street London store and 5th Avenue Flagship store in New York. On this project Louis Vuitton worked with London creative agency called Chameleon Visual, who designed, produced and installed this visual concept. (Nelson 2011; Chameleon 2010; Pubblicato da Pat a 2011)

Louis Vuitton’s large hand crafted ostriches now turned exotic from gold paint, bows and displaying the new accessory range, one standing two stories high and another, two display windows long in front of a luxurious tufted pink velvet wall. (Gissing 2011; Pubblicato da Pat a 2011) The handcrafted birds and eggs set is full of humour and wit enticing the customers to enter or return to the store. The set also has an element of surprise as each new product of the collection is revealed from one of the hatched ostrich eggs every few days- a concept of hatching fashion or the spring birth of fashion accessories. (My Modern Met 2010; Inspiration of The Nation n.d.; Gissing 2011; Chameleon 2010) The window display now is not only visually beautiful, but becomes interactive with the customers and persuades them to return. (Gissing 2011; Nelson 2011)

Major department stores all over the world have embraced this advertising technique. The artistry of window displays continues to evolve and still delights modern consumers.

Louis Vuitton’s Ostriches Grace 5th Ave. (2011), KNSTRCT, viewed 20th September 2015,

Louis Vuitton’s Ostriches Grace 5th Ave. (2011), KNSTRCT, viewed 20th September 2015, < http://www.knstrct.com/art-blog/2011/05/09/3703&gt;

Louis Vuitton: Ostrich New Bond Street London (2010), Chameleon, viewed 20th September 2015,

Louis Vuitton: Ostrich New Bond Street London (2010), Chameleon, viewed 20th September 2015, < http://chameleonvisual.co.uk/louis-vuitton-ostrich-new-bond-street-london/&gt;

References

Nelson, A 2011, Louis Vuitton’s Ostriches Grace 5th Ave., KNSTRCT, 9th May, viewed 20th September 2015, < http://www.knstrct.com/art-blog/2011/05/09/3703&gt;

Chameleon 2010, Louis Vuitton: Ostrich New Bond Street London, Chameleon, 31st August, viewed 20th September 2015, < http://chameleonvisual.co.uk/louis-vuitton-ostrich-new-bond-street-london/&gt;

Gissing, O 2011, The Louis Vuitton Ostrich Displays are Beckoning People Inside, Trend Hunter, 2nd June, viewed 20th September 2015, < http://www.trendhunter.com/trends/louis-vuitton-ostrich-displays&gt;

Inspiration Of The Nation n.d., Louis Vuitton’s Ostrich Shop Window, Inspiration Of The Nation, n.d., viewed 20th September 2015, < http://inspiration-of-the-nation.com/2012/07/louis-vuittons-ostrich-shop-window.html&gt;

My Modern Met 2010, Creative Window Display: Hatched at Louis Vuitton , My Modern Met, 9th September, viewed 20th September 2015, < http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/creative-window-display&gt;

Audas, J, n.d., Window Displays, Love To Know, n.d., viewed 20th September 2015, < http://fashion-history.lovetoknow.com/fashion-clothing-industry/window-displays&gt;

Pubblicato da Pat a 2011, Louis Vuitton’s Ostriches Grace 5th Ave., Put Something in the Fridge, 10th May, viewed 20th September 2015, < http://putsomethinginthefridge.blogspot.com.au/2011/05/louis-vuittons-ostriches-grace-5th-ave.html&gt;

Opris (CAS STANILA, M. & Bratucu, G. 2013, “Visual Merchandising Window Display”, Bulletin of the Transilvania University of Brasov Economic Sciences Series V, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 51-56

Friedlander-Boss, K 2015, The evolution of the role of window dressing in the high street shopping experience, its relationship with visual merchandising and its function within contemporary fashion retail environment, Academia.edu, viewed 20th September 2015, < http://www.academia.edu/3447819/The_evolution_of_the_role_of_window_dressing_in_the_high_street_shopping_experience_its_relationship_with_visual_merchandising_and_its_function_within_the_contemporary_fashion_retail_environment&gt;

Berry, J 2015, ‘Contemporary Fashion: Fashion as Spectacle’, retrieved from Griffith University, Queensland College of Art, Learning@Griffith website, viewed 15th September 2015, < https://bblearn.griffith.edu.au/bbcswebdav/pid-1510371-dt-content-rid-5019005_1/courses/2432QCA_3155_SB/Course%20Content/Week%2012%20Fashion%20Spectacle/fashion%20spectacle%20wk%2011%202.pdf&gt;

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